Canadians and Australians in mid-30s to exchange gap years

Holidaymakers up to 35 years old can now work in each other’s country under a reciprocal scheme

Travellers from Canada aged up to 35 years will soon be able to apply for a year-long working visa in Australia. And from 1 November Australians up to the same age can travel to Canada under a reciprocal scheme.

From 1 November Australians up to to 35 years old can travel to Canada under a reciprocal scheme — Shutterstock Canadians and Australians in mid 30s to exchange gap years
From 1 November, Australians up to to 35 years old can travel to Canada under a reciprocal scheme – Shutterstock

The countries have provided young travellers with gap year work and travel opportunities for decades. But now, the programmes will offer options for slightly older travellers.

This means that Canadians and Australians can now take a gap year despite already having a career and life trajectory in progress. The approach will expand the current programme under which travellers currently have to use the option during or immediately after their studies.

“The Working Holiday Maker scheme has been a resounding success for over 40 years, and many young people have availed of it over that period,” said Julian Ledger, CEO of YHA Australia, a youth hostelling association in the land Down Under.

“Working holidays broaden horizons, build life experiences and strengthen cultural relationships. This age extension is welcome as career paths have become less linear and will enable those who were not able to take a working holiday when younger to now do so”.

Australia has already been providing reciprocal Working Holiday Maker programmes with 41 countries — Shutterstock Canadians and Australians in mid 30s to exchange gap years
Australia has already been providing reciprocal Working Holiday Maker programmes for 41 countries – Shutterstock

The countries have been profiting from such programs as temporary visitors often become ambassadors for the country and are likely to come back later in their life to show the place they once called home to their children.

Australia has already been providing reciprocal Working Holiday Maker programmes for 41 countries. The aim of these is to allow travellers to stay longer and to experience a wider range cultural exchange. The working holidaymakers have temporary working rights, they acquire new skills and experiences, and they have the unique opportunity to fund their travels.

The working backpackers have the reputation of high-value travellers in Australia. Instead of spending a two-week holiday on the main sites, they often go further afield and off the beaten track.