Flight attendant warns passengers against in-flight coffee

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Flight attendant warns passengers against in-flight coffee

By
15 January 2018

By | 15 January 2018

“Don’t drink the coffee on airplanes,” an anonymous stewardess has said

Jokes about in-flight meals quality have been overdone for decades. But apparently, the coffee is way worse than a portion of tasteless mac and cheese.  

“Don’t drink the coffee on airplanes," says a flight attendant allegedly working for a major American airline. Bottled water and ice is harmless, she added — Shutterstock in-flight Group Created with Sketch. “Don’t drink the coffee on airplanes,” a flight attendant allegedly working for a major American airline has said. Bottled water and ice is harmless, she added — Shutterstock

In an article answering all questions passengers have towards cabin crews, an anonymous flight attendant who allegedly works for a major American airline told Vice.com that passengers should stay away from the coffee served on board.

“Don’t drink the coffee on airplanes. It’s the same potable water that goes through the bathroom system,” Betty – as Vice calls her – claimed.

“We recently had a test for E. coli in our water and it didn’t pass, and then maintenance came on and hit a couple buttons and it passed. So, avoid any hot water or tea. Bottled and ice is fine, of course.”

The attendant also added that the toilets were “the most disgusting places on the planet.”

“There’s no way these people act this way in their normal lives,” Betty said. “But they get on a plane and go, ‘Cool, I’ll just pee all over the floor and dump my peanuts right on the ground.’”

When asked to comment on the in-flight coffee quality warning, Alison McAfee, spokesperson for the industry group Airlines for America, told the NY Daily News that she couldn’t speak to this particular remark.

“However, what we can say is that the safety of our passengers and crew remain the airlines’ primary focus, which includes the provision of clean drinking water,” she said.

“The airline industry is subject to the Aircraft Drinking Water Rule,” she added, “which requires rigorous processes to ensure onboard water systems are regularly disinfected and that clean drinking water is available.”