India’s Jogulamba temple to become new tourist hotspot

The Jogulamba Gadwal district plans to give the ancient site a complete makeover and attract more visitors

With the beauty of Taj Mahal, the neverending beaches of Goa, and the vibrant energy of the Holi festival, India has many reasons to welcome millions of tourists every year. And soon, the subcontinent will provide its visitors with yet another impressive hotspot.

The Jogulamba temple in Alampur will soon receive a complete makeover — Shutterstock India’s Jogulamba temple to become new tourist hotspot
The Jogulamba temple in Alampur will soon receive a complete makeover — Shutterstock

The ancient Jogulamba temple in the Telangana state’s city of Alampur has already been a sacred site attracting pilgrims across India as well as from foreign countries. Now, the local authorities have decided to invest in its renovation as well as in the improvement of the city’s infrastructure and facilities to turn the location into a new hub.

The administration of Jogulamba Gadwal district — where the temple is located — plans a huge makeover of the ancient site. To provide the visitors with comfortable conditions for their stay, the district will also set up new restaurants and parking lots, lay out new roads, and renovate bus stops.

In addition, the district will build an auditorium for cultural programmes and other basic facilities allowing the tourist to spend more time there. In Sanghameshwara — a nearby city on the Srisalaim dam — new bathing ghats will be established.  

The Alampur Navabhrama temples belong among sacred sites attracting thousands of pilgrims — Shutterstock India’s Jogulamba temple to become new tourist hotspot
The Alampur Navabhrama temples belong among sacred sites attracting thousands of pilgrims — Shutterstock

The proposals were prepared by the Telangana Tourism Development Corporation and have to be approved by the Union ministry of tourism.

The Jogulamba temple is part of the Alampur Navabhrama Temples and it is listed by the Archaeological Survey of India under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act. It is considered one of the country’s Shakti Peethas — significant shrines and pilgrimage destinations in Shaktism, the goddess-focused Hindu tradition.

The uniqueness of the Alampur group of temples lies mainly in their plan and design in the northern architectural style introduced by the Chalukyas of Badami between 650 CE and 750 CE.

Alampur is also easily accessible to foreign visitors. The city lies around 220 km from Hyderabad and is connected by the HyderabadBangalore highway.