Last week in travel: these 10 airlines make the most on selling extra services

Emirates provides Wi-Fi on flights over the North Pole, while Ryanair lands in Beirut for the first time, and Vienna’s U-Bahn are trialling perfumed carriages  

Ancillary services are becoming a major source of revenue for more and more carriers. According to a new research conducted by IdeaWorksCompany, together, the top ten carriers offering ancillary services have managed to earn more than $35.2 billion in 2018. In comparison, back in 2007, they generated $2.1 billion in the sector.  

100 per cent of Ryanair’s and easyJet’s ancillary incomes come extra services such as additional bags — Shutterstock Last week in travel: these 10 airlines make the most on selling extra services
100 per cent of Ryanair’s and easyJet’s ancillary incomes come from extra services such as additional bags — Shutterstock
 

The researchers analysed nearly 150 airlines out of which 70 reveal their ancillary revenue. The way airlines generate ancillary revenue differs among low-cost and legacy carriers. While 78 per cent of American’s ancillary revenue comes from frequent flyers programmes, 100 per cent of Ryanair’s and easyJet’s ancillary incomes come only from the à la carte extra services such as additional bags or seat allocation. 

In addition, the researchers compared the top ancillary revenue per passenger by global regions. While in Europe and Russia the highest revenue per passenger belongs to Jet2.com with the value of $43.91, Spirit dominates the Americas with the revenue of $50.94 per passenger, and Virgin Australia makes $34.74 on each traveller in Asia & South Pacific.  

Top 10 airlines with the highest ancillary revenue

  1. American — $7.2 billion
  2. United — $5.8 billion
  3. Delta — $5.6 billion
  4. Southwest — $4 billion
  5. Ryanair — $2.8 billion
  6. Lufthansa Group — $2.6 billion
  7. Air France/KLM — $2.6 billion
  8. easyJet — $1.6 billion
  9. Spirit — $1.5 billion
  10. Air Canada — $1.4 billion

Emirates to implement Wi-Fi on flights over the North Pole 

Emirates passengers bound for the US will soon be able to enjoy Wi-Fi, mobile service connectivity and Live TV broadcast, even while flying 12 km above the North Pole and Arctic circle.

The coverage over the North Pole should be ready by 2022 — Emirates Last week in travel: these 10 airlines make the most on selling extra services
The coverage over the North Pole should be ready by 2022 — Emirates
 

The UAE-based airline has been trying to implement better inflight connectivity, with every aircraft connected to Wi-Fi, voice and SMS services. However, on its flights to the US, which often travel across the polar region, passengers can find themselves without connectivity for up to four hours. 

This is because most satellites that connect aircraft are geostationary, located over the equator, and aircraft antennae cannot see the satellite when in the far north, due to the earth’s curvature.

Emirates partner Inmarsat will soon solve this problem with the addition of two elliptical orbit satellites. This will provide coverage over the North Pole by 2022.

The new satellites will also support Live TV broadcast on Emirates flights allowing customers to watch live news or sports over the polar region. Emirates Live TV is currently available on 175 aircraft including all Boeing 777 and select Airbus 380s.

Tourism has become the fastest-growing sector in the UK

Travel and tourism has become a major sector for the United Kingdom. According to a new research conducted by World Travel & Tourism Council, the travel market accounts for 11.9 per cent of all jobs in the country, ahead of financial services (8.9 per cent) and banking (3.4 per cent), and generates $286 billion (£232 billion) annually.

"Tourism sector underpins much of UK spending and supports jobs" — Shutterstock Last week in travel: these 10 airlines make the most on selling extra services
“Tourism sector underpins much of UK spending and supports jobs” — Shutterstock
 

Currently, the UK is the world’s seventh most popular tourist destination and the fourth in Europe, with almost 40 million visitors each year. 

Gloria Guevara, president and CEO of WTTC, said: “As we know and is now reaffirmed by this benchmarking research, the tourism sector underpins much of UK spending and supports jobs.

“WTTC commends the UK government for recognising the clear importance of the industry as a driver of economic growth and for their strategy in spreading the benefits of the industry across the country.”

Ryanair lands in Beirut for the first time

Europe’s largest low-cost carrier — Ryanair — has announced its first-ever flights from Beirut

Lebanese consumers and visitors can now book their holidays to Paphos for this winter — Shutterstock Last week in travel: these 10 airlines make the most on selling extra services
Lebanese consumers and visitors can now book their holidays to Paphos for this winter — Shutterstock
 

The new connection will take off three times per week from Lebanon’s number one airport to Paphos, Cyprus.

Lebanese consumers and visitors can now book their holidays to Paphos up until March 2020.

Ryanair spokesperson Chiara Ravara said: “We’re pleased to announce Ryanair’s low fares have arrived at Beirut, our newest airport and first in Lebanon.

“Our new route to Paphos, Cyprus commences in October and will operate three times weekly for winter 2019, ensuring customers in Lebanon can book low-fare flights to Paphos as far out as March 2020.”

Vienna’s U-Bahn are trialling perfumed carriages  

People using Vienna’s efficient public transport has received an unusual surprise this summer. To make commuting less challenging over the season’s heat, the subway has implemented perfumes into carriages of a few U-Bahn trains.

The city reportedly uses a perfume with decend citrus aroma — Martyn Jandula / Shutterstock Last week in travel: these 10 airlines make the most on selling extra services
The city reportedly uses a perfume with decent citrus aroma — Martyn Jandula / Shutterstock
 

It means that once passengers enter the crowded carriage, they are met not with a mix of human odours, “but with the subtle aroma of citrus fruit”.

This way, the city is reacting to complaints that the air in the subway system was unpleasant during the summer, despite widespread air conditioning. And the new measure has provoked a considerable debate. 

However, the perfume trial is not the first time Vienna tried to improve the summer commute. Last year, the city handed over 14,000 deodorants to passengers at the notoriously stuffy U6 line. 

The initiative was highly appreciated by the locals who grabbed 14,000 sprays in a single day. The deodorants were “torn out of our hands,” said Daniel Amann, a spokesman for the Wiener Linien public transport company.

He claimed that the passengers in Vienna are definitely not more odorous than in other cities. “This was primarily intended as a consolation,” he said. “High temperatures can also make one more aware of odours.”