Liquids and laptops in carry-on bags might be allowed in US airports

Travel news

Liquids and laptops in carry-on bags might be allowed in US airports

By
31 July 2018

By | 31 July 2018

New 3D scanners tested at 15 American airports could result in fewer bag checks and less strict rules

Passengers flying in the United States might soon be able to keep their liquids and laptops in their hand luggage.

The agency responsible for bag checks, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), is currently testing new computed tomography scanners that will allow more precise examination of carry-on bags in three dimensions.

Computer tomography allows the agent to check carry-on bags while creating a 3D image that can be rotated 360 degrees — TSA Liquids and laptops in carry-on bags might be allowed in US airports Group Created with Sketch. Computer tomography allows the agent to check carry-on bags while creating a 3D image that can be rotated 360 degrees – TSA

Currently, TSA agents use 2D scanners to check the contents of carry-on bags. The new approach and its sophisticated algorithms enable detection of explosives and other threats by creating a 3D image that can be viewed and rotated 360 degrees.

“TSA is committed in getting the best technology to enhance security and improve the screening experience. Use of CT technology substantially improves TSA’s threat detection capability at the checkpoint,” said TSA Administrator David Pekoske in a statement.

“By leveraging strong partnerships with industry, we are able to deploy new technology quickly and see an immediate improvement in security effectiveness.”

TSA began testing CT technology in June 2017 at Phoenix airport and Boston’s Logan international airport where the agency installed first devices. Another CT scanner was placed at John F. Kennedy international airport in July 2018.

On Monday, the TSA launched the test at 15 American airports, with the aim of having up to 40 units in place at airports around the nation by the end of the year, along with 16 units at federal testing facilities. More than 145 are expected to be in airports by the end of 2019’s fiscal year.

The technology is currently being tested at these 15 American airports:

Baltimore-Washington International Airport 
Chicago O’Hare International Airport 
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport 
Houston Hobby Airport 
Indianapolis International Airport
John F. Kennedy International Airport
Boston Logan International Airport 
Los Angeles International Airport 
McCarran International Airport 
Oakland International Airport 
Philadelphia International Airport 
Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport
San Diego International Airport 
St. Louis Lambert International Airport 
Washington-Dulles International Airport