Paris to ban tourist buses

Buses in the city centre are no longer welcome amid complaints of too many visitors and talks of environmentally friendly alternatives

Hopping on and off a tourist bus is likely to become a thing of the past in Paris. Times are progressing and so is the guise of the City of Lights as it is making efforts to switch to alternative forms of transportation.

Emmanuel Grégoire, Paris’s deputy mayor, said the town hall is working on reducing the number of tourist buses and constructing parking areas outside the city. He said: “Buses are no longer welcome in the very heart of the city.”

There are a number of initiatives taking place in order to reduce the mark overtourism is leaving on the city. What’s more, just this week Paris has banned all diesel vehicles older than 13 years from its centre, which is yet another measure tackling the city’s pollution.

Grégoire encourages visitors to walk, cycle, and make use of public transport around the capital rather than relying on petrol-gurgling coaches and buses, which are polluting the popular tourist destination.

 

Peacefully enjoying the Sacré-Cœur might be as hard as herding cats — MyImages - Micha / Shutterstock Paris to ban tourist buses
Finding a serene moment at the Sacré-Cœur might be difficult these days — MyImages – Micha / Shutterstock

“We no longer want the total anarchy of tourist buses in Paris… Buses are no longer welcome in the very heart of the city.” 

“Tourists can do like everyone else does and switch to environmentally friendly mobility options or take public transport. We need change,” said Grégoire.

Other European cities tackling mass tourism

According to Grégoire, Parisians are alert to issues linked to overcrowding, although the situation has not reached the levels of Amsterdam, Barcelona or Venice. Cruise ships have become one of the main concerns in Venice after one of them hit a tourist boat in June. 

The number of visitors to France does not seem to be decreasing. The 2018 number of 89.4 million is up from 86.9 million people in 2017. Similarly, tourist arrivals to Paris were up by two million, from 48 million in 2017 to 50 million in 2018.