Week in travel: Bangkok named world’s most visited city

Los Angeles airport allows marijuana in carry-on bags, while British Airways celebrates 60 years anniversary of first transatlantic flight, and Malmo opens world’s first disgusting food museum

With more than 20.7 million visitors, the capital of Thailand, Bangkok, was last year’s most visited destination in the world. According to the annual Mastercard Global Destination Cities Index, the tropical hub managed to maintain the position for the third year in a row and is expected to welcome 9.06%per cent more in 2018.

Bangkok was the most visited city in 2017 — Pexels Week in travel: Bangkok named world's most visited city
Bangkok was the most visited city in 2017 — Pexels

The South East Asian metropolis beat London which had 19.83 million visitors and Paris with 17.44 million both business and leisure travellers in 2017. With 15.79 million visitors, Dubai clocked in at number four and Singapore at number five with 13.91 million guests. New York ranked sixth as the only North American destination in the top 10 with 13.13 million international travellers.

London, Bangkok and the other top destinations are all so different yet have one thing in common: they’ve figured out how to capture the imaginations—and dollars—of visitors,” said Miguel Gamiño Jr., EVP for Global Cities at Mastercard, in an email.

“Without a doubt, travellers are a critical driver of economic activity in these destination cities. They’re spending on everything from hotels and taxis to restaurants and spas to clothes and other goods.”

Top 10 most visited destinations

  1. Bangkok, Thailand – 20.05 million
  2. London, United Kingdom – 19.83 million
  3. Paris, France – 17.44 million
  4. Dubai, the United Arab Emirates – 15.79 million
  5. Singapore, Singapore – 13. 91 million
  6. New York, United States of America – 13.13 million
  7. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia – 12.58 million
  8. Tokyo, Japan – 11.93 million
  9. Istanbul, Turkey – 10.70 million
  10. Seoul, South Korea – 9.54 million

Los Angeles airport to allow marijuana in hand luggage

Passengers at the Los Angeles International airport will soon be able to take a small amount of marijuana through security in their carry-on bags.

People 21 years of age or older can have up to 28.5 grams of marijuana and 8 grams of concentrated marijuana for personal consumption — Pixabay Week in travel: Bangkok named world's most visited city
People 21 years of age or older can have up to 28.5 grams of marijuana and 8 grams of concentrated marijuana for personal consumption — Pixabay

The airport reacts to current legislation because, since 1 January 2018, it has been legal in California “for individuals 21 years of age or older to possess up to 28.5 grams of marijuana and 8 grams of concentrated marijuana for personal consumption.”  

“The Los Angeles Airport Police Department will allow passengers to travel through LAX with up to 28.5 grams of marijuana and 8 grams of concentrated marijuana,” the LAX airport said in an official statement.

However, travelling with the substance still won’t be easy as each state has a different policy. For flights within the US, it depends on where the passenger is going. In case of travelling between two states where marijuana is legal, such as California and Vermont, all should be fine upon landing.

Malmo opens world’s first disgusting food museum

From Swedish fermented herring, to maggot-infested cheese from Sardinia, or Icelandic rotten shark, it almost looks like people all around the globe want to compete with each other in cooking the most disgusting dishes possible.

 
 
 
 
 
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Su Callu Sardu or Goat kid’s rennet cheese. It’s called Sardinian Viagra and the taste is described as gasoline and ammonia mixed with wax. #disgustingfood #foodporn

A post shared by Disgusting Food Museum (@disgustingfoodmuseum) on

To display all repugnant meals humanity has come up with, the Swedish city of Malmo is about to open the world’s first disgusting food museum.

Between 31 October and 31 December, the museum will show exhibits such as roasted guinea pigs from Peru called Cuy, Stinky tofu from China, or Durian – infamously stinky fruit from Thailand.

“The evolutionary function of disgust is to help us avoid disease and unsafe food. Disgust is one of the six fundamental human emotions. While the emotion is universal, the foods that we find disgusting are not. What is delicious to one person can be revolting to another,” the museum says on its official website.

 
 
 
 
 
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Casu Marzu. This autumn in #malmö #disgustingfood #italianfood #casumarzu

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“Disgusting Food Museum invites visitors to explore the world of food and challenge their notions of what is and what isn’t edible. Could changing our ideas of disgust help us embrace the environmentally sustainable foods of the future?”

Looking at the pictures of the exhibits, one can hope that there won’t be free samples.

British Airways celebrates 60 years since operating first transatlantic jet engine flight

Sixty years ago, British Airways, then called BOAC – British Overseas Airways Corporation – became the first airline to fly a turbojet engine aircraft between Europe and New York, reducing the journey time from 18 hours to around seven.

British Airways were the first to operate transatlantic jet engine flight in 1958 — British Airways

On October 4, 1958, the airline flew two de Havilland Comet 4 aircraft, one from New York to London and the other from London to New York. One of the original cabin crew members, Peggy Thorne, 91, had joined BOAC in 1950 and was hand-picked to serve customers on the first flight.

On Thursday, British Airways hosted Peggy, and Captain Hugh Dibley FRAeS, a former Comet 4 navigator, at an event to celebrate the historic achievement.

“It was marvellous” Peggy remembers. “We were used to travelling to New York on Boeing Stratocruisers which took up to 20 hours. We couldn’t believe the flight was possible in such a short time.”

Peggy Thorne, 91, had joined BOAC in 1950 and was hand-picked to serve customers on the first flight — British Airways Week in travel: Bangkok named world's most visited city
Peggy Thorne, 91, had joined BOAC in 1950 and was hand-picked to serve customers on the first flight — British Airways

Despite 60 years having passed, Peggy fully recalls the inaugural: “It was so exciting to be the first – it was wonderful. There were all sorts of dignitaries on board, press and the chairman of BOAC. It was a thrilling experience.”

“We served customers Madeira biscuits and coffee when they came on board, followed by cocktails and canapes, and then a five-course lunch with wines. Petit Fours followed and then there was Afternoon Tea! Our customers loved it – they ate and drank from when they got on board until the time they got off.”

Chile opens new hiking trail through Patagonia

In order to boost tourism while highlighting the need for natural conversation conservation, Chile has recently unveiled a huge scenic route through the wilderness in Patagonian.

The new Patagonian Route of Parks is 2,800 km long — Pixabay Week in travel: Bangkok named world's most visited city
The new Patagonian Route of Parks is 2,800 km long — Pixabay

With the length of more than 2,800km, the South America country’s new Patagonian Route of Parks stretches from the city of Puerto Montt down to Cape Horn and covers a network of 17 national parks.

The trail – as well as the new national parks – was the idea of Tompkins Conservation, the foundation set up by US billionaire Douglas Tompkins and his wife.

Last year the foundation donated vast amounts of land to Chile’s government.

“We want Chile to be internationally recognised for having the most spectacular scenic route in the world, and thus become a benchmark for economic development based on conservation,” said Carolina Morgado, executive director at Tompkins.