Week in travel: Norway named best country for living

Venice to ban sitting in public, while Delta launches first biometric terminal in the US, and Paris opens a hotel entirely made of chocolate

The people of Norway have something to be proud of. According to a new ranking conducted by Deloitte, the Nordic land offers its citizens the best quality of life out of the 146 countries examined.

The agency evaluated major indicators that reflect quality of living and has come up with the rating for 2018 called the Social Progress Index.

Norway provides its citizens with the best quality of life — Shutterstock Week in travel: Norway named the best country for living
Norway provides its citizens with the best quality of life — Shutterstock

“The Social Progress Index measures what matters to citizens — health care, infrastructure, civil liberties — the very characteristics that are the foundation for sustainable societies. Designed to complement GDP, the index uses societal and environmental outcome indicators to provide an authoritative view across three dimensions: Basic Human Needs, Foundations of Wellbeing and Opportunity,” the newly published report says.

“Norway is the world’s top performer on the Social Progress Index in 2018, closely followed by three additional Nordic countries and Switzerland to round out the top five. Countries much larger in size and more diverse in population, including the Netherlands, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Canada also find themselves in the top tier.”

Top 5 countries for quality of life

  1. Norway
  2. Iceland
  3. Switzerland
  4. Denmark
  5. Finland

Delta to launch first biometric terminal in the US

American carrier Delta Air Lines is about to change their check-in process in the United States. It will be the country’s first carrier to implement a biometric terminal at Maynard H. Jackson international terminal in Atlanta.

The biometric terminal in Atlanta will be the first one in the U.S. — Delta Air Lines Week in travel: Norway named the best country for living
The biometric terminal in Atlanta will be the first one in the US — Delta Air Lines

Beginning late this year, customers flying direct to an international destination have the option of using facial recognition technology the whole way from the curb to the gate, transforming the customer journey with a seamless travel experience through the airport.

“Launching the first biometric terminal in the US at the world’s busiest airport means we’re bringing the future of flying to customers travelling around the globe,” said Gil West, Delta’s COO.

“Customers have an expectation that experiences along their journey are easy and happen seamlessly — that’s what we’re aiming for by launching this technology across airport touch points”

Delta employees’ input has been key to move facial recognition from testing to this full-scale launch — they’ve provided invaluable feedback on everything from the best camera angle for a successful scan to an added device enhancement that better facilitates face-to-face interactions with customers.

Based on initial testing, the facial recognition option not only saves up to nine minutes per flight, but provides employees an opportunity to have more meaningful interactions with customers throughout the journey.

Venice might ban tourists from sitting down

in its struggle with overtourism, Venice has decided to implement another unprecedented measure. The popular Italian town plans to ban tourists from sitting down on undesignated spots — with a fine of up to €500 for those who take an unsanctioned pew.

The Italian town plans to ban tourists from sitting down on undesignated spots — Shutterstock Week in travel: Norway named the best country for living
The Italian town plans to ban tourists from sitting down on undesignated spots — Shutterstock

The idea was proposed by the city’s mayor Luigi Brugnaro and will be voted on by the council in October.

The new rule is just another in series of measurements the city has implemented to fight the influx of visitors.

In May, city officials came up with a plan to segregate tourists and locals for a busy May Day weekend. Turnstiles were implemented in busy areas which led to protests. Eventually, locals tore the barriers down.

The city has also banned private boats from its canals and stopped the operation of major cruises.

Guests can book a night in a hotel entirely made of chocolate

Sweet dreams of true chocoholics have come true in Paris. An edible chalet made entirely of chocolate is opening its premises to guests in October.

The Chocolate Cottage is made out of approximately 1.5 tonnes of chocolate — Booking.com Week in travel: Norway named the best country for living
The Chocolate Cottage is made out of approximately 1.5 tonnes of chocolate — Booking.com

Designed and manufactured by a renowned artisan chocolati Jean-Luc Decluzeau, the 18-square-metre cottage, made out of approximately 1.5 tonnes of chocolate, is located in the glass house L’Orangerie Ephémère in the gardens of the Cité de la Céramique.

The cottage walls, roof, dresser, clock, cups, books, chandelier — and even fireplace — will all be immortalised in chocolate. The guests will also have the opportunity to take part in a workshop on how to make their own miniature of a chocolate chalet.

The price is only $60 (€50) a night — Booking.com Week in travel: Norway named the best country for living
The price is only $60 a night — Booking.com

Candy lovers can book their night in the sugary shed, which sleeps four, on Booking.com for just under $60 (€50) a night.

No Fs given: Airline misspells its name on side of plane

“You had one job!” may have been the phrase management said to the person responsible for painting a new aircraft for the Thailand-based airline Cathay Pacific.

The carrier received the plane with their name spelt as “Cathay Paciic”, meaning that there were “no Fs given that day”.

After noticing the error, the airline posted a picture on Twitter which has lead to hilarious reactions.

“Oops this special livery won’t last long! She’s going back to the shop!” the airline said in the tweet.

Some of the best reactions included punny jokes, such as “For F’s sake”, “Someone needs to get the F out” and “My, someone ucked up!” or “Errorplane”.