“Zero tolerance”: Glasgow airport bans tequila and sambuca

Large parties will also be monitored as Glasgow airport introduces new measures to curb drunken behaviour

Shots of tequila and sambuca have been banned as part of a scheme called Campus Watch that aims to bring an end to disruptive behaviour in Glasgow Airport.

Campus Watch is also monitoring large groups that appear to be travelling abroad for stag and hen parties. Scottish police will be notified about these groups so that they can be on hand if trouble ensues.

And efforts are being made to ensure that alcohol bought in the airport’s duty free cannot be drunk aboard flights.

The scheme, founded in a partnership between Glasgow Airport and Police Scotland in 2013, aims to tackle disruptive behaviour. It also provides support, training and advice to staff.

The measures are part of a new campaign to reduce pre-flight drunkenness. An advertising campaign has been launched across Scotland in an attempt to make sure people remember to be sensible when travelling through the airport.

According to the Sun, the scheme has seen alcohol-related incidents reduced by half.

The paper also reports that mixers, such as gin and tonics, bloody Marys or vodka and Cokes, will still be available. However, the Wetherspoons on the airport’s grounds has stopped serving cocktails.

Over the past year, Glasgow Airport has invested more than £10,000 in the introduction of a digital radio system so that information may be shared among staff and police. There is also a rapid text alert system in place across which passenger descriptions and travel details may be shared.

Francois Bourienne, chief commercial officer for Glasgow Airport’s parent group AGS Airports Ltd, told the National: “For many of our passengers, the airport experience signals the start of their holiday and there’s nothing wrong with this.

“We want to ensure our passengers continue to enjoy a memorable but ultimately safe and disruption-free experience.

“While it’s important to stress that the vast majority of passengers travelling through our doors do so responsibly and that incidents are extremely rare, Glasgow Airport continues to operate a zero tolerance approach to disruptive behaviour.

“Our Campus Watch system is effective because we work closely with our airline partners, retailers, caterers and Police Scotland representatives to address and often pre-empt incidents of disruptive behaviour at the airport.

“While we’ve chosen our peak summer period to promote this drive, Campus Watch is a year-round initiative.

“Thanks to our early-intervention approach to challenging disruptive behaviour, we’ve a seen a significant reduction in the number of incidents during the first five months of the year.

“However, one incident will always be one too many, particularly as disruptive behaviour can disproportionately affect a large number of passengers on board an aircraft.

“Campus Watch sends a clear message to what remains a very small minority of people acting in a disruptive manner that we continue to take a zero-tolerance approach to unacceptable behaviour.”